Aumerle R2

Aumerle R2

“You holy clergymen, is there no plot
To rid the realm of this pernicious blot?”

Richard II (IV.ii.55)

Aumerle

Aumerle

#Shakespeare

via Psalms

via Psalms

“144:1 Blessed be the LORD my strength which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight:”

Previously


Retirement Party

Retirement Party

B-Day Cake
I don’t know my age

I don’t know my age

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Funerals and Memorials, pt. 3

Funerals and Memorials, pt. 3

For part of my family, and I’ve borrowed this term because it fits, certain events are State Occasions. There is a pomposity and flourish required; decorum must be preserved. My memories are different, and I subscribe to an alien set of beliefs, but then again, that’s just me (and mine alone). No negative vibes towards family — they made us what we are.

There are several poignant memories, one that sticks out, this uncle was a charismatic speaker. For my grandfather’s funeral, I recall, the packed house at the 1st Presbyterian Church, I watched as my uncle stepped up to the microphone, and for a brief moment, looking out, a smile flashed across his face, and I thought I heard him think, “Always open with a joke.” The somber audience, and purpose of the gathering might squelch that, but yes, he was always pervasive public speaker. He could also read the room.

Family lore is that he got in trouble for pursuing a degree in “Communication” instead of science or engineering, or a doctor, like his brother. Led to a DJ gig on the radio, and that really opened up as he was the first local reporters to call in a news alert when Kennedy was shot in Dallas. Legend has it, my uncle walked right past the shooter who was rushing out while my uncle was rushing in to find a pay phone and report the news.

There are layers and layers of myth on top of fact owing to Southern Raconteur Roots?

Sure, there is that.

It’s family.

Funerals and Memorials, pt. 3

There’s another memory, perhaps from the same time, maybe from a different occasion, I’m not sure. Both brothers were still alive and obviously fit. They went for a jog together, or a run, I’m not sure. While I’m a walker, I don’t run unless something is definitely chasing me, and even then, if there’s no way to defend myself, then I’ll run. Having been a runner earlier in life, I understand the dynamic and the appeal, but I don’t participate unless, like I said, I’m being chased.

Mt Rainier

Mt Rainier

I just recall, a living room and the two brothers, suited up in shorts and t-shirts, one with super-high-tech running shoes, and the other with a slightly sloppy, well-used pair of trainers, and they were gone, for a few miles, or something. The only time I saw them bonding like that. It did exist, and that was then. Both brothers are now gone.

The last couple family gatherings, as he’s been hospitalized or heavy sedated, I don’t know what, but he wasn’t the vibrant electric, charismatic individual who said grace, replacing his father as the main pipeline to the almighty in prayer, at Sunday’s big family supper. Nice, baritone, stentorian in essence and carriage, plus covered all the bases with the prayers. Short but not too short.

I’ve skipped actually seeing him, the last time, as what I want to remember is the guy with the flashy running shoes, going for a run with his older brother, on warm afternoon in Texas. Or that speaker, quick with a quip and joke — playing the audience like an orchestra.

Funerals and Memorials, pt. 3

There is one other memory, from decades past, and I was floating through his office, while he was composing a speech, a press release, or something similar. He had an IBM Selectric, and he was quickly hammering out, two-finger style, some pretty prose.

That IBM was his tool of choice, on actual paper.

Respect.

Plain and simple, we use, what tools work, and what tools work for us. Rumor, and some detritus, suggests that manuscripts were done on paper and corrected with pen and ink, then retyped, as corrected. What’s leftover, these days? ARC, Advance Reading Copies that still have a typo or two.

My respect is for working with what works. When everyone else was graduating to computers and enjoy that kind of new-found freedom, my uncle was always freest when he worked in his favored medium.

I recall his admin at the time, “He types it out and I scan it into the computer to use it.”

Funerals and Memorials, pt. 3

Funerals and Memorials, pt. 2

Funerals and Memorials, pt. 1

Reservation Dogs v. 2

Reservation Dogs v. 2

Sideways, because, who like a narrative that goes in order? Remember the video sensation from a year or two back? Nathan Apodaca “vibing” to Fleetwood Mac, while drinking cranberry juice? He’s a supporting role. Seeing him on screen made me squeal.

There’s also respect that the production uses a mostly (according to show notes) Native American cast (and crew). I’m guessing the hills east of Tulsa — Oklahoma.

Looking up what I wrote about, maybe a year ago? I found that far more eloquent and a better summation, but the sophomore season is most excellent — maybe better.

“Magical realism,” think that’s the fancy, literary term. So much of the Southwestern Literature I grew up on is that kind of myth and reality remix.

Rhetorical? Is magical realism if it really happens?

color TV

color TV

#ReservationDogs

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More politics

More politics

“Get thee glass eyes,
And like a scurvy politician, seem
To see the things thou dost not.”

Lear in Shakespeare’s King Lear (IV.vi.142-4)

“… like a scurvy politician, seem
To see the things thou dost not.”

Scurvy politician

Scurvy politician

#Shakespeare

Twenty Years Later

Twenty Years Later

From the Prime list, unknown, looked interesting, cost nothing (free).

“Schadenfreude had become the new American pastime.” Page 38.

Yes, there is that.

“A writer is someone who writes, not just someone who sells published books.” Page 94.

Plus that.

Then there’s another 200 pages of twisted, weird, “no one saw that coming,” kind of material. Rather enjoyable, and fast-paced, kept with a certain intensity, just shy of, I’m not sure.

Bonus points for a hot — retired — special agent. Is it requirement that FBI agents be attractive? Don’t know, just asking, rhetorical. In real life and on the page.

Would gladly recommend as a thriller, with a twist at the end.

Twenty Years Later


Experimental and Experiential

Experimental and Experiential

This why there’s always a blog, Savez.

“Confusion now hath made his masterpiece!”

    MacDuff in Shakespeare’s Scottish Play (2.3)

Originally1, it was an individual, hand-coded page with a scant paragraph about whatever I did that day, and after a few years, I hit upon the tag line, “Experimental and Experiential.”

Hand-coded. Uploaded by FTP protocol each day, for the new entry. Long before there were databases with content driven by dynamic display.

I was doing book reviews, or, at least mentions about whatever I was reading at the time. These days, I do more of pointer and link, unless I get into something that I want to interact with, and then I get verbose. It happens.

Think I’ve listed this elsewhere, but astrofish.net/xenon became SkyFriday.com, astrofish.net/blog, astrofish.blog, BexarCountyLine.com, and a few others I can’t recall.

Digging around2, I found that my own name, Kramer Wetzel, is unique enough, and as a pointer, perhaps the best tool I’ve got as people tend to confuse astrofish.net with just astrofish, and that doesn’t work.

Experimental and Experiential

The horoscopes have been in production since, I’ve got a paper copy of some of the earliest, with no date, I’m guessing around 1987, recollections are fuzzy. Regular, online since 1993, pre-web, then rolling over to a web presence in 1994, and a weekly by 1995. The weeklies ran on Monday morning, being posted, again by hand, Sunday night.

I swapped that out for a Thursday date, and then, during the pandemic and its associated depression, I went with just monthly, but that didn’t last long.

It was only a matter of time until I was itching to get back to a weekly.

Experimental and Experiential

I toyed with this last year, going to work in the monthly with weeklies at 7, 14, 21 and 28 — 4 times in a month. That is ending soon, too, as halfway through this experiment, I figured, next few years, I’ll stick with what I know, and I can do a publish date anytime I want it.

I like Tuesday. By next year, I’ll keep pushing out the horoscopes on Tuesday, think the e-mail version3 drops on Thursday, not sure, don’t recall what those preferences were set at.

Shrug.

Experimental and Experiential

As long as I’ve got coffee and cognition, I can keep doing this.

As always? This is all Experimental and Experiential.

Kramer Wetzel

Please support public libraries.

#shakespeare
#horoscope

  1. Original location, astrofish.net/xenon.
  2. Two questions about various URLs.
  3. The mailing list, opt-in.
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Sweet Swan of Avon

Sweet Swan of Avon

Sweet Swan of Avon: Did a Woman Write Shakespeare? – Robin Williams

Many years distant, I encountered Mark Rylance as he started to set up the then-new Shakespeare’s Globe Bankside. Unassuming little Capricorn guy, with a weirdly scholarly take on all matters Shakespeare. He always had a casually cautious infectious enthusiasm about “things Shakespearean.” As an actor, his history is performing, managing, starring, directing, and offering interpretations of Shakespeare’s works — pretty close to the whole canon. Some years ago, I saw him on stage as Richard II, one of those once in a lifetime shows.

In several places, Rylance weighs in with a sentiment that suggests we keep an open mind, as there is scant hard evidence about Shakespeare’s life, just a few scraps of paper.

The Truth Will Out – Brenda James & William Rubinstein

Of interest this was the authorship question some years back with the title, The Truth Will Out, and what annoys me more, being unable to find my own reading notes for that text. Then again, an alert reader sent in notices about some recent material, and that upstart crow Rylance merely suggested that we look at the possibilities, not hold it all hard and fast. Factually, there is very little left besides a name and the plays themselves.

Sweet Swan of Avon

One of my professional associates noticed a Shakespeare shirt I was wearing, and that lead to a suggestion about a book that I know I saw, just never seemed interested in, not until now.

“Suggested a woman wrote Shakespeare,” she stated, and that left me an opening as conventional wisdom suggests Shakespeare’s female characters were the first “modern” females, characters that were fully fleshed, not cardboard cutouts.

A verbal recommendation, about a topic that I have a passing interest in, that got me to look at the book. Or the digital copy, and I was sorely unhappy about how this fell out, a paperback copy of the book, regular Amazon retail was less than a digital copy.

I also know me. Recently, I acquired a few more bookshelves. That means more bookshelf space, but also points to a problem with what books do I really want to hold onto? Winnowing and frugal existence in a trailer taught me to only keep books that I like and might have deep, intrinsic value, something with an emotional appeal. Seriously, I have too many Shakespeare books as it is, and this is only a casual interest in the subject. The older I get, the more appealing the scholarship is, but this really is more along the lines of a hobby that I use at work.

Despite the price disparaging, I got the digital version.

Sweet Swan of Avon

From the “Induction?”

“The purpose of this book is not to prove that Mary Sidney wrote the works attributed to Shakespeare—I only hope to present enough documented evidence to elicit the curiosity of others to pursue further research into this possibility.” Page i.

Some years back — both in weblog and horoscope — I’ve mentioned the lack of available Shakespeare hard data. A couple of fragments of documentation, and that’s about it. I recall one one of the better books about the life of William Shakespeare started with supposition, and continued that theme, throughout the book. Guesswork and supposition. Academic knew he would not stand up to scrutiny and he wrote to accommodate.

Part of the appeal of the Sweet Swan of Avon is that it is supposed spark conversation — maybe not a debate — but its text proves the notion that supposition and circumstantial material is as valid, but must be regraded in such light.

Sweet Swan of Avon

“There is no documented evidence to support this theory.” Page 199.

While the book made a splash in fringe Shakespeare circles, an oddity rather than a revered work, still, it valiantly illustrates a point that I like.

It’s about looking at the works themselves, and then, looking at the evidence, and using Shakesoeare as an example? Different theories all drawn from the actual, accidental, and peripheral evidence, then too, using just the plays, the extant texts themselves, as the source for some of this.

Mishmash of literary theories played against the relative paucity of hard evidence, which, in effect, makes this more fun, in a weirdly academic way.

Sweet Swan of Avon

Sweet Swan of Avon: Did a Woman Write Shakespeare? – Robin Williams

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